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I am writing and editing scientific papers and sometimes I come accross the noun "results" and become very confused as to what preposition should follow. It usually happens when the paper is mentioning simulation results for/of a variable that was an output of the simulation process.

Example: Let X1 be a variable that is one of the outputs of a simulation. The paper reads: "In Table 1, the simulation results for/of X1 according to variations of X2 are presented". I think "for" is the correct preposition but I also see people using "of" in similar cases. Could you explain which one is more appropiate?

Thanks in advance.

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    In general, one would use results of (a test). However, when comparing two sets of results, it is better to show results for option one and results for option two. However, either one is acceptable.
    – Davo
    Feb 7 '17 at 14:06
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    Hi Davo, why don't you make it an answer? It would be a good answer.
    – user218421
    Feb 7 '17 at 14:08
  • As an editor of a national newspaper, I usually come across results of/from/in...I did not get for even one time. Results of ..seem appropriate one to show a causal effect. And from would be ok when we use it to show stg. is a consequence of some other thing. Eg. Inflation could result from growing demand for specific commodity. And devaluation of currency may result in better competitiveness in the international market. Economic growth is the result of sound policy... Feb 8 '17 at 7:07
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"In Table 1, the simulation results for/of X1 according to variations of X2 are presented".

It is mostly a matter of what seems to improve the flow.
Subtract the descriptor "simulation"

"In Table 1, the results of X1 according to variations of X2 are presented"

and the flow, or sound, of the statement seems fine with "of".
But, with "simulation"

"In Table 1, the simulation results of X1 according to variations of X2 are presented".

"of" doesn't seem to flow as well

"In Table 1, the simulation results for X1 according to variations of X2 are presented".

but with "for" the flow seems fine.
There is not an issue with correct prepositions here. Others might not have a "flow" issue with either, and some might consider one preposition preferable to another is some situations. "For" and "of" are both fine here, as far as grammar goes.

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  • It's seems weird but when I add the descriptor "simulation" in Ngrams, I get more results for "simulation results for" than for "simulation results of". As Davo says, I think this may be related to the number of variables/options that are having their results presented. [link] (books.google.com/ngrams/…) Feb 7 '17 at 17:02
  • Pablo Virus, different people have different ideas about what "Sounds" correct.
    – J. Taylor
    Feb 7 '17 at 18:27
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In general, one would use results of (a test). However, when comparing two sets of results, it is better to show results for option one and results for option two. However, either one is acceptable.

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Result of: You are stating something. (generally speaking)

Result for: You are making a statement pertain to something distinct. (specific subject)

Although people have accepted both ways for most contexts, I believe that there is a distinct difference.

E.g: The test results of our chemistry class will be posted on the front board. The test results for our chemistry class will be...

Since we have developed an advanced form of emphasis into our language by using vocal tones and the timing of our words, the need to differentiate has become obsolete.

However, one cannot input these emphasis techniques into text without the further use of symbols or text alterations, so it has become common to use either for any context.

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  • A good answer that would benefit from a linked referrence to an authoritative source. Please enjoy the tour and when you have quite a bit of free time, read-up in the help center about how we work. Welcome to EL&U. Jun 8 '20 at 8:31

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