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I'm finding myself wondering about which of these you'd find more correct:

"I went to dinner last night with two young men neither of whom was correctly dressed for the occasion"

"I went to dinner last night with two young men neither of whom were correctly dressed for the occasion"

The first one sounds right to me, but I don't know why.

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Just as none means not one, neither means not either; and since not one is singular, so is not either. This means that both none and neither must be treated as singular.

neither - determiner, pronoun, conjunction, adverb

B2 not either of two things or people:

  • We've got two TVs, but neither works properly.
  • Neither of my parents likes my boyfriend.
  • Neither one of us is interested in gardening.

Cambridge Dictionary

However, see “None” as plural indefinite pronoun. You may be able to use either, but not neither. (singular or plural)

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Both singular and plural verbs can be used, the singular is more formal but the plural is and can be used when referring back to a plural noun.

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