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I wish to to know the correct usage of "than" in the following sentences

[1]. The melting temperature of solvent A is comparatively lower than those/than that of other binary solvents involving B and C manufactured by the firm.

[2]. Usain Bolt ran his 100 m final race at London 2012 faster than in 100 m race at Rio 2016.

How to modify [2] such that the second "100 m race" does not appear.

Thank you---Suddhasattwa Ghosh, India

  • Note that you don't need to include the word "comparatively" in your first example sentence, because the rest of the wording makes clear to readers that you are comparing melting temperatures. Likewise you wouldn't have to say in the second sentence, "Usain Bolt ran his 100 m final race at London 2012 comparatively faster than in [his] 100 m race at Rio 2016." – Sven Yargs Feb 3 '17 at 7:50
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Use than that for number 1

[1]. The melting temperature of solvent A is comparatively lower than that of other binary solvents involving B and C manufactured by the firm

This is because the subject is the melting temperature.

For the second sentence if you were going to use than in that manner you would add the to the end of it

[2]. Usain Bolt ran his 100 m final race at London 2012 faster than in the 100 m race in Rio 2016.

To reword the sentence I would use something like

Usain Bolt ran the one hundred meter dash faster back in 2012 than he did in 2016

  • Thank you...Extending the discussion further, pl. see the sentence below – Suddhasattwa Ghosh Feb 3 '17 at 10:42
  • To say: The melting temperature of solvent A is lower than THAT of other binary solvents.... implies that other binary solvents melt at the SAME higher temperature. To say: The melting temperature of solvent A is lower than THOSE of other binary solvents.... implies that the other solvents melt at different higher temperatures. – Ronald Sole Feb 3 '17 at 12:04
  • @RonaldSole I don't think that implication really applies, but maybe it depends on context. Readers of this text might know that it's unlikely that all but 1 solvents have the same melting temperature, so they wouldn't make that inference from the wording. – Barmar Feb 3 '17 at 20:36
  • @Balmar How about: His time was slower than that of the other two runners. and His time was slower than those of the other two runners? – Ronald Sole Feb 4 '17 at 11:28
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My first answer is the same as @Scu11y, and for the same reason. I also do not see that implication.

For the second case, I would actually edit it as:

[2]. Usain Bolt ran his 100 m final race at London 2012 faster than at Rio 2016.

or

[2]. Usain Bolt ran his 100 m final race at London 2012 faster than that at Rio 2016.

(where "that" refers to "his 100 m final race"; the first one without "that" is sufficient though, since the context is obvious here.)

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