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"With the advent of the 21st century, our ability to collect and share copious amounts of data have been unprecedented. This deluge of information, coupled with the scientific advancements in recent history has the potential for us to model from the mere abstract to the practical applications that aid in our daily lives."

Also, do these sentences make sense? I am trying to convey that practical applications are now viable.

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  • maybe you mean purely??
    – Jim
    Feb 1 '17 at 2:11
  • "mere" usually suggests that something is small and insigificant. So unless you want to suggest that being abstract makes something of less importance, it's not an appropriate word.
    – Barmar
    Feb 1 '17 at 21:44
  • our ability (to collect and share copious amounts of data) has been unprecedented Feb 12 '17 at 2:00
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The word mere is neither wrong nor useful in that particular construction. Completely different wording might use 'mere' to make much of the difference.

Since you ask 'do these sentences make sense?' they do, but not readily

Centuries do not have advents. They have, for instance, starts.

Mere data is hardly relevant; information is worth sharing.

Ability is singular.

‘With the advent of… anything… anything has been unprecedented’ more than overeggs the pudding; it tries to give one sentence two subjects.

If the subject is the 21st century (or its advent) then we might have acquired an unprecedented ability.

If the subject is our unprecedented ability, then that might have become apparent in the C21.

The (whatever) of the 21st century is contradicted by any advancements in recent history. To maintain the C21 theme, speak at worst of recent ’years.’

If the idea is to highlight the potential, the deluge of information and the scientific advancements should be the other way round.

If the idea is to highlight the fact that our ability to collect and share copious amounts of information provides the potential for anything, the deluge of information and the scientific advancements should be the other way round.

We might, for instance, develop from the abstract or extrapolate either way but we model from the practical to the abstract.

Applications either help in our daily lives or aid our daily lives.

If you're trying to convey that practical applications are now viable then start with those words: 'Practical applications are now viable'. That might mean slipping sideways to something like 'Practical applications previously undreamed of are becoming viable…'

I see that's not an ideal choice of words and the fact is, you's said about eight different things before introducing your main point, when you could easily have introduced it at Word One.

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  • Coo… that was kind of someone. What's the problem there, please? Feb 12 '17 at 17:10

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