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What would be the easiest and shortest way to describe that someone does something without looking at it?

If I translate that from my native language into English, I always come up with sentences like:

They stand with their backs to each other swing their batons on blind at the approaching hordes of…

This »on blind« is a direct translation from my home country language, but in Google books, I cannot find any connections with what I am trying to say with it.

To say:

He walks on the corridor, senses someone behind him, and swings his fist on blind.

Does that make sense in American English?

Any other suggestions that do not implement numerous of words to describe this simple action like:

He raises his hand without to look at the approaching opponent – danger – thing.

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    I think saying blindly would be idiomatic in these cases. – Tushar Raj Jan 29 '17 at 9:49
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    Blind is an adjective, which isn't generally available as an object of a preposition. You could say in blindness to express manner, but we have a serviceable adverb blindly for that purpose. – deadrat Jan 29 '17 at 9:57
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There may be some terms that will work for you.

Walking down the corridor, he sensed someone behind him, turning, he swung his fist indiscriminately Dictionary.com

or

he swung his fist instinctively Dictionary.com

or

he swung his fist blindly

No doubt there will not be a single term that will do for every use you think is "on blind".

You might want to check synonyms of the three choices above and determine the best word for the situation.

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  • Thanks for all your effort in this @J.Taylor. I guess blindly is the easiest way – it is also an adverb, something that we were supposed to avoid in screenplay writing (at least that is what some say). Luckily, for me this situation does not come up so often in my stories. I simply prefer to use hits instead of hitting in my stories – it is clearer – sharper and leaves no doubts. – Syk Mar 19 '17 at 11:44
  • @ Syk using the adverb is not required. "he took a blind swing"....."he took an indiscriminate swing"............there is more than one solution – J. Taylor Mar 19 '17 at 12:11

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