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Is there any emergent rule for verb tenses for dealing with action across time zones?

Today is 26 Jan in the US, but right now it is already 27 Jan in Australia. Do I, in the US, say "Today is Australia Day" or "Today was Australia Day"?

(Edited from comment, thanks Hank!) The context was a casual conversation, brought up as (no offense to Australians) trivia or "Did you know?" facts. My location was in the US, where the day is not recognized, and at the time it was 27 Jan in Australia.

A 10th grade grammar textbook near at hand shed no light on the subject, neither was the topic mentioned by Miss Manners (on the chance it was solved by custom.)

closed as off-topic by Dan Bron, Cascabel, curiousdannii, Drew, Scott Jan 27 '17 at 6:50

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    Why would you say either? What is the context? Are you trying to say, "Today is tomorrow in Australia"? – Hank Jan 26 '17 at 21:32
  • Context: a casual conversation about current events. I had said "Today is Australia day." But right now it is not the 26th of January in Australia, where the day is recognized. – Carson Elmore Jan 26 '17 at 22:08
  • Please add it to the post, not everyone reads comments. – Hank Jan 26 '17 at 22:10
  • What is "Australia day"? – Hank Jan 26 '17 at 22:11
  • The national holiday, under a bit of controversy at the moment. – Carson Elmore Jan 26 '17 at 22:15
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If Today is the 26th where you currently reside, then the correct sentence would be:

"Today is Australia Day"

Today was Australia Day, by itself, is contradictory; if today is the 27th, then today was never Australia Day. At that point, "Yesterday was Australia Day"

The only correct use of was would be "Today was Australia Day in 1987"

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    Actually, "Today was Australia Day in 1847" makes reasonable sense. – Hot Licks Jan 26 '17 at 23:12
  • Updated the answer. – Hank Jan 26 '17 at 23:15
  • Also at 10:00pm at night after a day of celebration one might easily say, “today was Australia Day.” – Jim Jan 27 '17 at 3:55
  • At that point, "Today is still Australia Day"; I don't think "was" is necessary. Maybe "This day was Australia Day" (insinuating it is now night) – Hank Jan 27 '17 at 3:56

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