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How can I express below idea in just one sentence?

Someone is coming. We are not sure about it. But strong possibility is there. And we assume that he is coming. But not yet reached here. We don't know the current position of his travel.

So can I say about his coming like this?

He must have been coming.

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No. The sentence you have created expresses the past tense. "He must have been coming" means that you assume he was coming at some time in the past, but the action is not completed.

What you can say is "he must be coming" or "he must be on his way". The word "must" used in this sense is not as absolute as it may seem. It simply implies that you are assuming something is true.

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  • Thanks :) Thanks. If I say ' He might be coming' what does that mean?
    – ameen
    Jan 24 '17 at 5:35
  • If you say "he might be coming", it means you are not sure if he is coming. It expresses a possibility, but your tone of voice or facial expression will often show whether you believe "might" means "probably" or "probably not".
    – Jen
    Jan 24 '17 at 15:41
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I believe what you are trying to say is "He must be coming." If someone is coming, even presumably, and that person has not yet reached his destination, he is in the act of doing so.

"He must have been coming" implies that the subject was performing the action (coming), but is no longer.

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  • Thanks. If I say ' He might be coming' what does that mean?
    – ameen
    Jan 24 '17 at 5:35

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