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I want to ask you about something. Please help me solving my confusion.

So, I've been feeling confused with the word "fail". Sometimes, I see that people write "You are failed" and the other times, I see that people write "You failed". What's the difference?

And when I opened Google for an answer, instead of getting the answer, I was faced with another confusing word. It's "finish". What's the difference between "I'm finished" and "I'm finished" (or even "I've finished")? I think they all have the same meaning.

If they are the same in meaning, why do they come with different forms?

Please help, kinda find it confusing :(

closed as off-topic by curiousdannii, Drew, Cascabel, Dan Bron, jimm101 Jan 24 '17 at 18:50

  • This question does not appear to be about English language and usage within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • "Are failed", while perhaps technically OK, is not idiomatic in most contexts. – Hot Licks Jan 23 '17 at 21:58
  • Hi @Agnes, welcome to ELU. Just a note about your question: In the third paragraph where you've written what's the difference between I'm finished and I'm finished, you probably meant the difference between finished and failed (at least that would be my guess based on the rest of your question). Correcting that misstatement should increase the likelihood of receiving a worthwhile answer to your question. – freeling10 Jan 23 '17 at 21:59
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From a native speaker:

You failed means you did not succeed in a task or a test.

You are failed means the judge or teacher marked your task or test with a failing grade.

I'm finished means I completed my task, as in "No more cake, thank you, I'm finished."

I'm finished can also mean I am completely overcome, I am entirely ruined, my long-term opportunities are over, as in "Grandma, I'm finished. You have led me to ruin my diet completely!" You could also say "No more poker. You finished me!"

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