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I have a sentence using suggest:

Adults with a wide range of work experience can suggest young people the most effective strategies to look for a job.

The absence of "to" in the words "suggest young people" seems wrong. But including "to," ,as in "can suggest to young people" doesn't sound right either. Suggest to in that usage could mean that the young people have that thought occur to them spontaneously: "It suggested to the young people that..."

Here, I want to say that adults are actually making a suggestion. What can I replace suggest or suggest to with, in order to make it clear that the adults are making a suggestion?

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    There are two possibilities: You can keep experience in the singular and change various to a range of; or you can use various with the plural experiences. You also need to insert to, as you suggest.. I should also change strategies to look for a job to strategies for finding a job. But that's a matter of style rather than grammar. – Ronald Sole Jan 14 '17 at 12:34
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    What @RonaldSole said, and you could consider "share with" as an alternative to "suggest to" and maybe shorten the last phrase to "the most effective job-hunting strategies." – Papa Poule Jan 14 '17 at 12:43
  • 'Adults with various work experience can make suggestions to young people about the most effective strategies for job-seeking.' // 'Can suggest young people strategies' is ungrammatical; the non-volitional-agent usage of 'suggest' (eg 'their behaviour suggests that they're from a different group of meerkats') is admittedly vaguely possible here, but an unlikely reading. – Edwin Ashworth Jan 14 '17 at 17:07
  • Change "suggest" to "advise". (It really should be "suggest to" in your above example anyway. There is nothing in "suggest to" that implies a "spontaneous" thought.) – Hot Licks Jan 16 '17 at 2:03
  • Most properly: Adults with various work experiences (or "varied work experience") can advise young people on (or of) the most effective strategies for job-seeking. – Hot Licks Jan 16 '17 at 2:06
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This phrasing offers an alternative to the use of "suggest":

With their wide range of work experience, adults are in a good position to offer advice to young people about effective job-hunting strategies.

If you use the phrase in a position to, here you convey the idea that it would be a good idea for adults to make use of their experience and offer to help young people. The word good expresses your opinion a little more strongly, and the word offer further highlights that there is a choice here for adults to make.

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  • Welcome to English Language & Usage! We're looking for long answers that provide some explanation and context. Please explain why your answer is right, ideally with citations. Answers that don't include explanations may be removed. – NVZ Mar 17 '17 at 20:03
  • Rereading the original question, I think now that I misunderstood what she was trying to say. I think she is looking for something like this: "With their wide range of work experience, adults are in a good position to offer advice to young people about effective job-hunting strategies." – Kevin Mark Mar 19 '17 at 5:26
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A word that fits your sentence grammatically and semantically is teach:

Adults … can teach young people the most effective strategies to look for a job.

Unfortunately, teach is a stronger word than suggest.  A person can suggest something just by mentioning it; to teach usually entails explaining and/or demonstrating.

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