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This may seem like a trivial question, but it's been bothering me for quite some time. Which would be most appropriate? The first seems to imply that I received a single A that covers all the exams, while the second seems to imply that I received multiple As for each exam. I'm still leaning towards the latter:

I received an A on all of my exams.

I received As on all of my exams.

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I feel exactly the same as you when reading both sentences together. However, we mustn't let ourselves get carried away by grammatical conundrums. The logical meaning of both of these sentences is that you got an A on each of the exams you did, as it's not possible to get a single A for multiple exams, nor various As for one test. I believe anyone would interpret it more simply if they didn't pay close attention to the grammar.

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  • Thanks for the post. If nobody else offers input, I'll go ahead and select yours as the answer. – AleksandrH Jan 14 '17 at 2:32
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I agree with KSE Academy's answer: in practice, neither sentence implies anything incorrect, since contextual knowledge will disambiguate the meaning.

That said, the second does sound better to me:

I received As on all of my exams.

If you wanted to be more "precise", it is possible to say something like

I received an A on each of my exams.

but as mentioned, there's no practical reason to be this precise with this sentence.

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The Phrase "straight As " pronounced [ Straight Ayes ] means that an A was obtained in every exam. Not an A+, not an A-, but all A. Before grade inflation such a result was very rare. I will put it in a sentence:

You need at least straight As to get into Otago Medical School.

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    I have noticed that your posts have inverted space/punctuation at the end of sentences. I realize this may be something you struggle with, or perhaps were unaware of, but please try to correct it. (Like. This.) (Not .This .) – JYelton Oct 11 '19 at 16:23
  • @JYelton .I will try to get with the program .My screen name does have some truth in it . – Autistic Oct 12 '19 at 7:10

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