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How are intent and intention distinguished in terms of usage?

My guess after checking my pocket dictionary is

Intent is used to mean a bad purpose.

Their intent to kill the boy is crystal clear!

Intention is used in other cases.

Their intention is to enjoy seeing the cashflow.

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3 Answers 3

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This is taken from a site similar to this:

"Intention is the general word implying a having something in mind as a plan or design, or referring to the plan had in mind. Intent, a somewhat formal term now largely in legal usage, connotes more deliberation (assault with an intent to kill)"

Thus, an intention is a general plan that one has in mind. An intent is really a deliberate plan.

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    Any view on OP's hunch that "intent" has negative connotations?
    – Fiksdal
    Apr 19, 2016 at 16:53
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"Intention is the general word implying a having something in mind as a plan or design, or referring to the plan had in mind. Intent, a somewhat formal term now largely in legal usage, connotes more deliberation (assault with an intent to kill)"

That explanation is certainly better than mine, and I find it true.

Edit: You asked for sentences; sorry.

My intention was to buy a long dress to wear as a guest at the wedding. However, after shopping awhile, I didn't find any styles of long dresses that I liked, so I bought a short one instead.

Our apartment building has a strict policy of no pets. My neighbor, George, rarely visits me. So when he knocked at my door this morning, I just knew his intent was to find my cat!

Thus, an intention is a general plan that one has in mind. An intent is really a deliberate plan.

get information

also use this link

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**Intention projects larger purpose of accomplishing an idea,while an intent is a purpose for an special /particular project.**strong text****

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