0

A person tells me not to do something, while they do it all the time.

What do you call such a person? I just don't feel hypocrite suits them in this situation.

  • 3
    Why don't you feel "hypocrite" is suitable? – Jesse McGrew Jan 9 '17 at 9:14
  • What situation? – WS2 Jan 9 '17 at 9:25
  • I just felt that there might be a better word – user214277 Jan 9 '17 at 10:12
  • @WS2 : For example, this person keeps on singing all the time, but when I sing, he asks me not to – user214277 Jan 9 '17 at 10:15
  • A number of questions arise. Is he/she your boss? Are you both singing in tune? Would there be any particular reason to object to what you are singing - e.g. for political reasons, (Do you come from Northern Ireland, by any chance?) reasons of decency etc? – WS2 Jan 9 '17 at 13:13
3

The boss is the only person who can tell others (his employees) not to do what he does all the time. However, there are also people (a parent, a dictator, a spouse) who act like that as part of their authoritarian character.

Those who simply advise others not to do what they themselves do, are really hypocrites. There is no better term.

  • hypocrite - noun - "a person who claims or pretends to have certain beliefs about what is right but who behaves in a way that disagrees with those beliefs"
0

irreconcilable / Double-faced / dissembler All of these are defined as '' A person who engages in the same behaviors he condemns others for.'' Although the best usage for your situation is hypocrite. But if you think that is is contradicting you, then use ''contradictory''

-1

Sometimes 'poser' can work - 'a person who attempts to impress others by assuming or affecting a manner, degree of elegance, sentiment, etc., other than his or her true one'.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.