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Our espousal of modern learning mediums is an insignia of our progressive thinking.

Have i used the word 'insignia' correctly? What I want to convey is the fact that our acceptance of modern learning channels over the conventional mediums is a sign that effectively represents our progressive thinking and our ability to adapt to and accept change.

closed as off-topic by sumelic, Dan Bron, NVZ, jimm101, BladorthinTheGrey Jan 9 '17 at 17:36

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    "Insignia" is rarely used with a singular indefinite article like this. It most commonly occurs in phrases like "the insignia" or "his insignia" where its grammatical number is ambiguous. In fact, it comes from a Latin plural word, so it has often been treated as plural in English as well. The Oxford English Dictionary goes so far as to call the singular usage erroneous, although its use as a singular noun is listed in other contemporary dictionaries without this warning. – sumelic Jan 9 '17 at 4:07
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    It's grammatical, but whether it means what you want it to mean is beyond our knowledge. What does your dictionary say insignia means? – DJClayworth Jan 9 '17 at 4:09
  • DJClayworth what I want to convey is the fact that our acceptance of mordern learning channels over the convetional mediums is a sign the effectively represents our progressive thinking and our ability to adapt to and accept change. – Josh Jan 9 '17 at 4:13
  • I'd read this wikipedia definition en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insignia and understand that even if there are alternative uses for it, ... coupling a token of formal power with the idea of progressive thinking and change just feels a bit off – Tom22 Jan 9 '17 at 4:20
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Have i used the word 'insignia' correctly?

No. According to my dictionary, insignia means a mark or badge that indicates rank or membership in an organization. It looks like you're trying to use it in a metaphorical sense -- espousal is an action, it cannot literally be a physical object like a badge. The metaphor fails because the comparison between progressive thinking and the kind of organization that would indicate membership with an insignia is weak.

There are better word choices to get your point across. You could say that "espousal of modern learning mediums" is a hallmark or a sign or an indication of progressive thinking, for example. The word badge is sometimes used metaphorically, so you could say that "espousal of modern learning mediums" is a badge of the progressive movement.

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