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Upon asking about the Spanish equivalences of Senior, Junior and III, I got to know that these are commonly used in United States, but not that much in Britain. Talking about the United Kingdom, a user said:

(...) I suspect that since we do not have a common solution parents avoid the situation, We did have prime ministers called Pitt the elder and Pitt the younger but that is not a current usage as far as I know.

And in fact, Wikipedia on suffix names states that:

In the United States the most common name suffixes are senior and junior, which are written with a capital first letter ("Jr." and "Sr.") with or without an interceding comma. In Britain these are more rare, but when they are used the abbreviations are "Jnr" and "Snr", respectively.

So I wonder: how typical is to have the suffix name Senior, Junior or III in Britain? Is there a prevalence of it in any time in history?

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    Monarchs have been using regnal numbers from Saxon England to the present day. Lesser mortals tend not to aggrandise themselves in that way, probably precisely because of the monarchy. – Andrew Leach Jan 3 '17 at 19:41
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    When I was at school, three Smith siblings of various ages were called 'Smith major', 'Smith minor' and 'Smith minimus'. Wonderful stuff! – BillJ Jan 3 '17 at 19:51
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    @BillJ At my school we had Elliot major, Elliot minor, and Elliot tertius. The second and third were twins in my form, one twenty minutes older than the other - and that was how the younger became tertius. It was, to begin with mooted that he be minimus, but tertius was eventually settled upon. Are you aware that Boris Johnson, who was two years older than DC at Eton,was known to have referred to our former PM as "Cameron minor". – WS2 Jan 3 '17 at 20:05
  • I believe that one reason these are less common in Britain, is that it is less usual for a son to be given exactly the same set of Christian names as his father, than it is in America. Hence the need for Franklin Delano Roosevelt Snr; Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jnr, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt III. – WS2 Jan 3 '17 at 20:17
  • The only Junior I knew used it in place of the given name he shared with his father, rather than as a suffix. As even his (junior school) teachers used it, I didn't even know his real given name for several years. This was in London. – Chris H Jan 4 '17 at 12:31
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Well, despite it being difficult to provide evidence for a negative assertion, someone should answer: no, these terms are almost unknown in Britain.

For example, in a life teaching in a British university I never encountered one student who was a Junior, Senior or designated by a Roman numeral. Or anyone else.

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