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Demand for new cars in the U.S. increased in 2016. We expect demand for new cars to increase in 2017.

Demand for new cars in the U.S. increased in 2016. We expect the demand for new cars to increase in 2017.

The demand for new cars in the U.S. increased in 2016. We expect the demand for new cars to increase in 2017.

Global oil demand increased in 2016.

The global oil demand increased in 2016.

Oil demand in the U.S. rose in 2016.

The oil demand in the U.S. rose in 2016.

U.S. oil demand rose in 2016.

The U.S. oil demand rose in 2016.

There is this question that is related to my question. However, I think the answers did not clearly explain situations when "demand" and "the demand" are interchangeable and situations when they are not.

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    Are you using demand as a mass noun or count noun? That might help you determine which usage (anarthrous or not) is appropriate. Usually an anarthrous (w/o an article) count noun is ungrammatical without other modifiers. But in headlines, articles are generally dropped. It's difficult to talk about your sentences, because all of them are grammatical. But their grammaticality/appropriateness depends on their place & function in the discourse in which they appear. Asking about isolated sentences, or even two sentences, rarely provides enough context to talk meaningfully about article usage. – AmE speaker Dec 29 '16 at 16:48
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In formal contexts, or if you're writing for a more traditional reader (or if you're being paid by the word) "the" is probably preferred, but in normal business and journalistic contexts (at least in the US and Canada) it would be usual to leave it out.

See if you can find an example in The Economist. If they don't bother with "the", then nobody needs to.

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