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  1. I would like to introduce David my friend who can take care of all your needs.

  2. I would like to introduce David my friend who takes care of all your needs.

What is the difference between the sentences 1 and 2?

Here I want to introduce David to a stranger, and I want to know what will be the best sentence to use to get their attention or interest.

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    Welcome to Stack Exchange ELU! What is the context of these two sentences? Do you think they have a difference between them? What differences do you think exist? You need to show research and opinions before we can help. Please update the post with more detail, context, and your opinions based on research.
    – Hank
    Dec 22, 2016 at 17:24
  • Here I want to introduce David to a stranger, want to know what will be the best sentence to use to get their attention or interest.
    – user212072
    Dec 22, 2016 at 17:32
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    Please add the context to the post, not the comments. So others can follow along easier.
    – Hank
    Dec 22, 2016 at 17:33

1 Answer 1

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Beginning with the question as asked, option 2 is problematic.

  1. I would like to introduce David my friend who takes care of all your needs.

Grammatically, the present tense already has David assisting this person he has never met. The implication would be that you are almost ordering David to do so.

Option 1 is a lot better.

  1. I would like to introduce David my friend who can take care of all your needs.

This sentence simply states that David is available to help as the need arises.

Beyond what you asked, part of each sentence sounds unnecessarily awkward, to my ears anyway. I believe in this context most people would say "my friend David" instead of "David my friend". You would use "David my friend" if you were speaking directly to him and were expressing happiness. Perhaps you had not seen him in a long while. However, with a third party present and the focus on that other person, "my friend David" is meant to let that person know who David is.

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  • Note that one might say something to the effect of "This is David, who takes care of all the needs of visitors like yourself." In this case, David is already taking care of others in the same class as "you", so using the present tense to indicate an ongoing activity is legitimate.
    – Hot Licks
    Dec 22, 2016 at 22:51
  • IIUC, they want to say "I would like to introduce my friend David who will take care of all your needs." Dec 22, 2016 at 22:58
  • @HotLicks I agree; thank you for clarifying that point. Having a larger context can make a big difference.
    – RichF
    Dec 22, 2016 at 22:58

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