4

What is the correct way of saying the sentence?

My teacher doesn't approve of the first example that I have listed.

My teacher doesn't approve the first example that I have listed.

5

Stretching the answer of Deadrat little further:

For Op's given examples:

My teacher doesn't approve of the first example that I have listed.

Means:

The teacher does not agree with the first example.

While

My teacher doesn't approve the first example that I have listed.

Means

The teacher doesn't accept the example.

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  • But in the recent campaign, "approve" was used to mean "agree with" - "I'm Jane Doe, and I approve this message." – Mike Jones Dec 12 '16 at 15:50
  • 1
    @Mike Jones One swallow doesn't make a summer. – Edwin Ashworth Jul 1 '17 at 8:28
3

Approve has the meaning of agreement, but with the preposition, it means agree with:

I approved of your decision.

Without the preposition, it means agree to:

The executives committee approved your budget.

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0

In case it's not clear from the previous answers, you should used approve of in this context. If you're going for more of an "acceptance" meaning, just use accept:

The examiner didn't accept the first example that I have listed as a correct one.

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