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I am struggling to choose the correct / more idiomatic one between:

  • A description may be added for remembering the context better.
  • A description may be added to remember the context better.

What's the main difference between the two?

I mean, is using "for" kind of stronger and show the intention and speaks from point of a mentor (who knows the reason), while using "to" is more neutral and plain and speaks from point of a narrator?

  • I mean is using "for" kind of stronger and show the intention and speaks from point of a mentor (who knows the reason), while using "to" is more neutral and plain and speaks from point of a narrator? Do you agree? – F.I.V Dec 12 '16 at 7:47
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It seems that I have found the answer here. Considering the aforementioned page from cambridge.org, I understand this way:

The usage of for + ing may be right when we want to express:

  1. Function of something, for example:

    • We need something for storing recyclable materials.
    • Eclipse is one of the most popular tools for developing software applications.
  2. Reason of something, for example::

    • You should talk to Jane about it. You know, she’s famous for being a good listener.
  3. But NOTOurPurpose/intention, for example:

    • I am going to university for visiting [to visit] my professor.
    • There is a lot of juice for drinking [to drink].

My Conclusion:

It appears to me that the subject is important here. That means if I want to express my own intention or if we want to express our own purpose from doing something, then we fall into the last (third) scenario (were for + ing should not be used)

On the other hand, when we are speaking exclusively about some other people/things (nigher me, nor we are involved), then we may describe the function or reason as well as [even] the purpose/intention for usage/existence of something else with the for + ing construct.

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    There is a lot of juice ~for drinking~ [to drink] I disagree here. "For drinking" implies that the juice is intended for those who want to drink something. "To drink" implies that all the juice will have to be drunk (or at least is intended to all be drunk). – Flater Jul 17 '17 at 12:55
  • @Flater So you mean it is similar to something like "There is a lot of homework to do"? In which it shows retention or remainder of some work in progress. That means, we should/are expected to do all the homework. – F.I.V Jul 19 '17 at 7:31
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    Yes, that is exactly what I mean. Keep in mind that this is nuanced from context, e.g. "the doctor has many patients to visit" (he must do so) "there are many mountains to climb all over the world" (does not inherently mean that they must be climbed, but it can imply that the speaker would like to climb them all). – Flater Jul 19 '17 at 7:41

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