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I am writing from the point of view of a soldier in WW1 and I have a sentence:

I am in constant fear for my life, and nearly every second that bullets and shrapnel are not (insert word) I am praying that this war will end soon.

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    I'm guessing that your almost hits are what native speakers would call near misses, but I don't see any easy / natural way of introducing that into your sample context. Dec 4, 2016 at 17:18
  • In your context, I'd expect a verb or verb phrase, something like "raining down around me": "I am in constant fear for my life, and nearly every second that bullets and shrapnel are not raining down around me I am praying that this war will end soon." But that isn't at all what I would expect as an answer to the question in your title, which seems to be asking for a noun or noun phrase like @FumbleFingers suggestion. Could you edit to clarify what you're looking for?
    – 1006a
    Dec 4, 2016 at 18:26
  • "I am in constant fear for my life, and nearly every second that bullets and shrapnel are not killing me, I am praying that this war will end soon." Dec 4, 2016 at 18:41
  • Hahaha I am a native speaker, I am looking for a verb, near miss is a noun. I was looking for a close replacement to "whizz by," but more eloquent. @FumbleFingers
    – cbeen
    Dec 6, 2016 at 4:18

2 Answers 2

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Consider writing

I am in constant fear for my life, and nearly every second that bullets and shrapnel narrowly miss me, I am praying that this war will end soon.

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whizzing around me

whizz: [with adverbial of direction] Move quickly through the air with a whistling or buzzing sound: ‘the missiles whizzed past’

(Oxford)

This is a standard way of talking about bullets moving near a person. If you prefer, you could say "whizzing past me."

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