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Was readin song lyrics of a commercial song written in english and have two questions:

  1. One line goes "can't you see I'm hurting" - is that correct english to use?

  2. One line said "all for you" as implied - (I would do/I eould give) all for you - is it correct english to say all for you in that context?

P.S English is my second language and the songwriter as well I think

marked as duplicate by Laurel, Edwin Ashworth, Mitch, user140086, user66974 Nov 27 '16 at 13:07

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    Lyrics have different rules. – user58 Nov 26 '16 at 20:34
  • It is perfectly legitimate. – Hot Licks Nov 26 '16 at 21:25
  • Probably! There are a small number of verbs associated with various kinds of pain which fall at the boundary between stative and dynamic: hurt, ache, itch, feel sick etc. These occur equally readily in either aspect - compare My leg hurts (where the non-progressive suggests a state) and My leg is hurting (where the progressive suggests an activity). – BillJ Nov 26 '16 at 21:54
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Why would you doubt that?

Never you mind "lyrics have different rules" or "not everything a native speaker says is grammatically correct"…

"Can't you see I'm hurting" is perfectly acceptable in written or spoken or sung English.

"… all for you" could very easily be correct, but as posted above there isn't enough context to be certain… "I did it all for you" or "everything I did, I did for you" or "this is/was/would be/could be all for you" are perfectly acceptable, as could be dozens of other examples

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