3

See context below:

Bloomberg is well known for his malapropisms and mispronunciations: he's introduced former Yankee manager Joe Torre as "Joe Torres" [and] waxed rhapsodic about the famous singing duo "Simon and Garfinkle."

3

To wax rhapsodic about something is a common idiom meaning to praise something excessively.

As James indicated, the verb to wax is a verb meaning to grow, but the verb is very uncommon outside of a few contexts such as this idiom, and when speaking of the phases of the moon.

  • 1
    Until about a century ago it was almost always "wax wroth", but that's hopelessly archaic now. Today it's mainly "wax lyrical", with "rhapsodic" accounting for most of the rest. – FumbleFingers Jul 29 '11 at 14:51
  • Indeed; "to wax lyrical" is by far the most common variant. – m69 ''snarky and unwelcoming'' Mar 25 '17 at 3:11
1

In this context, "to wax" means "to grow." It is also commonly used to describe the moon as it goes from new to full.

  • 1
    This is incorrect. Bloomberg did not grow rhapsodic about Simon and Garfinkle [sic]. – MrHen Jul 29 '11 at 13:43
  • 1
    I grow weary of this pedantry. – FumbleFingers Jul 29 '11 at 14:52

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.