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I enjoy watching South Park on current events. In its tense twentieth season, Member Berries play a crucial role. While I’m afraid of not grasping the overarching concept entirely, I’d like this linguistic detail straightened out:

Is “’member” a common shorthand for “remember”? Is it in this particular instance?

If “member berries” were talking fruits that keep uttering nostalgic phrases, does “member” stand plainly for “remember”, or does it entail some broader indication? Does it simply drop a syllable colloquially, or is it part of some allusion?

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    'Member is indeed a contraction of remember. Member Berries may be a play on the word remembrances. – Mick Nov 18 '16 at 23:12
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    To me it sounds like a small child's word. – Colin Fine Nov 18 '16 at 23:21
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    I'm guessing that there were about five puns going on there. – Hot Licks Nov 19 '16 at 0:23
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    @HotLicks Snerk! you said member... – Spagirl Nov 19 '16 at 0:50
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    @Mick I would say it's closer to Memories. Like a portmanteau: mem-ber-ries. – Laurel Nov 19 '16 at 2:06
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I think it's clearly a contraction of remember. The berries constantly say things like "'member this?" and "I 'member that."

It's not a common contraction among people speaking proper English, but I believe it is a common mispronunciation among little children, for whom long words are harder to pronounce, and I believe this is what they're alluding to. They have high-pitched voices, which make them sound like little children. This contributes to the satire, because they're remembering things from years ago (like the original Star Wars trilogy), which little children wouldn't know about.

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