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Should I use of or for in this sentence? Are both correct, and if so, how are they different?

Make aware of the hazards and required PPE __ the HAZMAT they are using.

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    The problem looks to be that you are talking about the 'hazards of' and 'equipment required for' the hazardous material. Try reframing, maybe 'Ensure users of HAZMAT are aware of relevant hazards, have access to appropriate PPE and have been instructed in its use.' (Providing PPE isn't enough without instruction. )
    – Spagirl
    Nov 18 '16 at 14:24
  • Is this a bullet point or a sentence fragment? make aware is followed by OF. We were made aware of the hazards.
    – Lambie
    Nov 18 '16 at 14:28
  • Thanks for the info. But, this is a Goal for the workforce to accomplish where I work. The whole statement is: Supervisors will review with their employees each AUL/SDS so employees know where to find the SDS, are familiar with the SDS, and aware of the hazards and required PPE of the HAZMAT they are using. (as asked should after PPE be of or for?) Nov 18 '16 at 15:07
  • are the hazards specifically 'hazards of the HAZMAT'? If specific, 'hazards' needs an 'of'. If the PPE is for use with the HAZMAT, i'd say PPE takes 'for'. So you can have a clunky sentence where of/for is wrong for one, or you can restructure the sentence.
    – Spagirl
    Nov 18 '16 at 16:00
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    for - a given HAZMAT calls for particular PPE.
    – Drew
    Nov 18 '16 at 16:43
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The hazard doesn't have equipment as a property. Equipment is suited for a task or purpose. HAZMAT requires certain PPE. Your sentence pertains to equipment needed for that hazard.

Rewording it in this way shows that 'for' makes more sense.

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Make aware of the hazards and required PPE __ the HAZMAT they are using.

No preposition works in this gap. If we split it into two separate sentences we get:

  • Make them aware of the hazards of the HazMat they are using

  • Make them aware of the required PPE for the HazMat they are using

Therefore you can't use a preposition for both "the hazards" and "the PPE". If you want to stick with the current structure of your sentence, you need to separate it into two clauses with the relevant prepositions in each:

Make them aware of the hazards of, and the required PPE for, the HazMat they are using.

[The commas are optional. I prefer them, but feel free to remove them.]

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I think FOR is the correct usage here.

The PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) is FOR the HAZMAT (materials). The full phrase, if taken out of the sentence, would be:

Supervisors will review with their employees so [the] employees are aware of the required PPE for the HAZMAT they are using.

I hope that taking that part out will help you understand why it is correct.

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  • If you expand the acronyms, this doesn't make much sense: "...aware of the required [personal protective] equipment of the [hazardous] materials".
    – mustaccio
    Jan 17 '17 at 16:27
  • @mustaccio I don't really remember this question much but FOR does seem like a better use. Not sure why OF was ever my recommendation...
    – Hank
    Jan 17 '17 at 16:49

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