1

There are two sentences;

  • The graph can not be decomposed into two cycles.
  • The graph can be decomposed into two paths.

When I combine them, which are correct?

  • The graph can not be decomposed into two cycles, but can be into two paths.
  • The graph can not be decomposed into two cycles, but can into two paths.
  • The graph can not be decomposed into two cycles, but two paths.

Thank you for reading my question.

2

It would seem most natural to me to say "The graph can not be decomposed into two cycles, but can be into two paths." The second option is less explicit but implies the 'be' so seems acceptable. The last does not, I feel, clearly express the meaning. This reply is simply based on 60 years of speaking native English, I'll leave others to dissect the grammar!

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  • 2
    I agree, although I'd probably say "The graph can be decomposed into two paths, but not into two cycles." – 0xFEE1DEAD Nov 16 '16 at 19:03
  • Thank you very much. Very concise and understandable answer!! good!! – Danny_Kim Nov 16 '16 at 19:10

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