2

The Jonathan Coulton song "Sticking it to Myself" has an interesting style of lyricism in its second verse:

Sticking it to my
Self-control; that's not the only thing I lack
A plan.
Just my own gun against my
Back down now and let this hostage
Go away.
I'm trying to figure something
Makes me feel
Like I'd do anything it takes to be
A f---ing winner now.

The end of each line also functions as the start of the next, yet isn't repeated.

marked as duplicate by cobaltduck, user140086, tchrist single-word-requests Dec 16 '16 at 4:36

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The word you are probably looking for is enjambment. According to this article from The New Yorker, it is "the lit-crit term for a phrase in a poem that runs over into a second line." Oxford offers this definiton.

Read the question poetic effect of segmentation of a group of words.

  • In enjambment the portion that runs over only makes sense as part of one line, but in my case the word makes sense as part of both lines. – FracturedRetina Nov 15 '16 at 20:17

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