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Two singular subjects connected by or should always take a singular pronoun. This is what I have understood. But if I want to write something like this then the second one looks more natural to me:

  1. I don’t want your Facebook or Twitter account as I don’t use it.

  2. I don’t want your Facebook or Twitter account as I don’t use them.

  • "Facebook or twitter account" are not subjects in this sentence, so it's not an issue of subject-verb agreement. Instead, the question is about the proper choice of pronoun to refer to these conjoined noun phrases. – sumelic Nov 2 '16 at 4:35
  • Now the second example sentence seems to be correct. And does the conjunction "or" have any effect on the singularity or plurality of the pronoun? – Ahmbro Dude Nov 2 '16 at 4:41
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    The point is that the pronoun is being used as a pro-form to refer back to both "Facebook" and "Twitter". Since these are two distinct and separate entities, the proform must be plural "them". Despite what others say, there is no confusion about the meaning of "them" when used this way. We understand that you don't use either of them (not *either of "it") – BillJ Nov 2 '16 at 9:45
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Neither of those is great, with the first being especially confusing.

There is a confusion here, but it is not about the grammatical number so much as it is about whether your negation applies to the items separately or jointly.

Imagine at a summer barbecue someone offers you a sandwich hot off the grill, where hot dogs and ham patties are sizzling away. Consider then these choices:

  1. I don’t want a hot dog or a ham patty because I don’t eat it.
  2. I don’t want a hot dog or a ham patty because I don’t eat them.
  3. I don’t want a hot dog or a ham patty because I don’t eat either (of those).
  4. I don’t want a hot dog or a ham patty because I eat neither (of those).

The first is confusing because we don’t know which one you’re saying you don’t eat.

The second is better but still potentially confusing because we wonder whether you’re saying you don’t eat both of them at the same time, whether in one sandwich or in succession.

No such confusion exists in the third or fourth choices, because by using either or neither you make clear that you are negating both conditions. You don’t eat hot dogs and you also don’t eat ham patties: not one at a time, not two at a time, you do not like them, Sam-I-am. :)

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    It can't get better then this. – Ahmbro Dude Nov 2 '16 at 4:45
  • I want neither your Twitter account nor your Facebook account. – SovereignSun Nov 2 '16 at 6:48
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"Facebook" and "Twitter" in the first clause are used as adjectives of the singular "account", but the second clause treats them as nouns. It is not saying "I don't use your account."

It's a little like saying, "I don't eat cat or dog fur because I am allergic to them."

Regardless, even if we struck the word "account", this has to do with the negative. "I don't want your Facebook and Twitter" could mean you want one but not both, but "I don't want your F or T" means "I don't want your F and I don't want your T." In other words, the object of "I don't want" is both of them, not one of them.

I want this meal or that meal so I can eat it.
I don't want this meal or that meal because I dislike them.

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