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Bob Dylan’s first electric tour, the Velvets’ Exploding Plastic Inevitable, the Pistols and Buzzcocks in Manchester ’76. Some gigs continue to resonate for decades after the band leaves the stage. The Pink Floyd and The Soft Machine launching radical paper the International Times at the Roundhouse on October 15th 1966 is right up there.

I can't get the meaning of the last sentence. I know the construction "to be right up with" but it doesn't fit here.

closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, Helmar, Mitch, Scott, jimm101 Nov 2 '16 at 12:38

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  • It means the 1966 launch of IT is right up there (among the few right at the top), alongside other important "milestones" in music, such as Bob Dylan’s first electric tour, the Velvets’ Exploding Plastic Inevitable, the Pistols and Buzzcocks in Manchester ’76. – FumbleFingers Oct 31 '16 at 16:05
  • @FumbleFingers Still can't get it. Right up there among other newspapers? But the ones on top aren't newspapers they are events. – SovereignSun Oct 31 '16 at 16:08
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    The first "sentence" (which technically speaking is just a list, not a sentence at all) presents several important "events" in the history of modern popular music. They're really important, so we're being invited to imagine a "roll of honour" list of such things, with the most important ones at the top. By implication therefore, the IT launch is being positioned somewhere up near the top of that list of great events. – FumbleFingers Oct 31 '16 at 16:12
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"right up there" means near the top of the list of the best and greatest.

  • Okay. I think that is the answer I was looking for. Can I say 'popular' in such cases? – SovereignSun Nov 1 '16 at 6:09

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