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The question title describes very succintly the object I'm looking it's name or term in English. I know the name in spanish in Argentina, it's "cuello polar", cuello means neck, polar refers to "polar fleece" a type of cloth. It's not a scarf

Here there is search of images of "cuello polar",

These are typical: Fleece collar Collar with drawstring

Note: This can be worn as a hat to cover one's head too, but it's not ideal, since it's open on both ends and the top of the head with the hole could be exposed, in comparison to a real closed winter hat.

Is worn around the neck, it's toroidal shaped, it's made of polar fleece often, it's goal it's to warm the neck but also can be used to cover mouth and nose, it's normally used in winter with low temperatures.

  • I've heard it called a buff, but that might be branded. We also say balaclava, even though that isn't exactly what a balaclava is. – Unrelated Oct 27 '16 at 21:29
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    They are called neck warmers. – Mick Oct 27 '16 at 21:34
  • Is definitely not a Balaclava because it's not toroidal shaped like the google images I provide. A buff didn't provide me similar images to the search I provide in the post, they are in cloth area larger than "cuello polar". – Santropedro Oct 27 '16 at 21:37
  • @Mick Yes that seems very close, the google search images of that show various matches to my google image search, such as this one. – Santropedro Oct 27 '16 at 21:40
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    In ski resort shops in France, they're often called cache-cols. I've bought mine in one such shop, and as a result I've never actually known what to call it in any other language than French. I've been referring to it as my ‘necktube’ or my ‘fluffyfleecepullovertheneckwarmerthingy’ in English. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Oct 27 '16 at 23:27
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There doesn't seem to be consensus (though I do feel like if I was currently in a colder climate a word would immediately come to mind).

Buffwear is a clothing company that sells this product. They refer to generically as a neck warmer.

REI, the outdoor equipment company, refers to the category as neck gaiters.


[Edit] Taking this distinction from Choster in the comments:

Neck gaiter seems to be the term favored by outdoor recreation equipent manufacturers and retailers, whereas neck warmer comes first for department stores and Etsy accounts, although there is considerable overlap. e4hats.com calls the category neck bands, a subcategory of bands & warmers.

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    They are very similar to what I'm looking for, I'll wait to see if another names arise. – Santropedro Oct 27 '16 at 21:40
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    +1 for Neck gaiters. That is the normal term for outdoor recreation and climbing. – Phil Sweet Oct 27 '16 at 21:51
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    Neck gaiter seems to be the term favored by outdoor recreation equipent manufacturers and retailers, whereas neck warmer comes first for department stores and Etsy accounts, although there is considerable overlap. e4hats.com calls the category neck bands, a subcategory of bands & warmers. – choster Oct 27 '16 at 22:04
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    In the UK these are mainly worn by motorcyclists, to protect against wind chill in winter. They are sold as "neck warmers" or "neck warmer tubes". – alephzero Oct 28 '16 at 0:56
  • I would only ever have thought of calling it a neck warmer. Haven't had a motorbike in years but I still have a couple of these, they are great in the UK in Winter! – Darren H Oct 28 '16 at 6:22
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There's a garment serving that function that is called a snood in UK English. See for instance here.

We're looking for long answers that provide some explanation and context. Don't just give a one-line answer; explain why your answer is right, ideally with citations. Answers that don't include explanations may be removed.

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The name is Thermal Neck Warmer. See some here in amazon. They also call them Winter Fleece Snood.

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Growing up in Upstate New York, we called a similar item of clothing a dickie:

an article of clothing made to look like the front or collar of a shirt, blouse, vest, etc., worn as a separate piece under another garment, as a jacket or dress.

(Dictionary.com)

Usually they resembled the neck portion of a turtleneck, and had a bib-like portion that laid over the back and chest. I can imagine the word being extended to cover the type of garment you show.

Here's a Google image search.

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There's an article of clothing called a "muff", which oxforddictionaries.com defines as:

tube made of fur or other warm material into which the hands are placed for warmth.

The word "muff" can also evidently be used for clothing designed to keep other parts of the body warm, notably as in "earmuffs". From this, one could make the argument that the article of clothing pictured qualifies as a muff.

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