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Is there an adjective in English that describes an expectation specifically of something that already happened?

E.g. "Yesterday we sold €500 worth of goods, but given how many customers were in the shop, we should have sold about €1000." You could say the "€1000" here is the expected revenue. However, expected does not convey the fact that the revenue already occurred. Is there an adjective that does?

  • The missed estimated revenues were 500 euro. – user66974 Oct 27 '16 at 15:01
  • @JOSH However we lose the information that the expected amount was 1000. – MorganFR Oct 27 '16 at 15:25
  • @MorganFR - The missed estimated revenues were 500 euro out of 1.000. – user66974 Oct 27 '16 at 15:33
  • @JOSH there you go :P – MorganFR Oct 27 '16 at 15:34
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I believe in business it is customary to contrast the projected revenue (or some other variable) against the actual one. Other terms used in this meaning are forecast and planned.

financial projection

A forecast of future revenues and expenses for a business, organization, or country. A financial projection will typically take into account both internal information such as historical income and cost data, and estimates of the development of external market factors, providing estimated figures in addition to projections of the general financial condition of the company in the future.

http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/financial-projection.html

  • These anonymous downvotes will eventually kill this site. – michael.hor257k Oct 27 '16 at 17:46
  • Projected revenue can just as well refer to revenue we expect to receive in the future. I'm specifically looking to describe a revenue we had expected to receive in the past, given now-knowns such as number of customers. – Mark Nov 2 '16 at 7:41
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I was looking for the opposite of predicted (specifically the opposite of the "pre" part):

retrodicted

to make estimates about the past using information from the present or other events from the past.

http://thefreedictionary.com/retrodict and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retrodiction

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If you use "expected" but use past instead of present, e. g. the expected revenue was €1000, it tells that it may not align with the real amount.

  • Yes, but as OP points out it does not rule out the fact that they actually were not. – user66974 Oct 27 '16 at 15:12
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You should check potential.

"Yesterday we sold €500 worth of goods, but given how many customers were in the shop, the potential revenue was about €1000."

ODO:

potential ADJECTIVE

[attributive] Having or showing the capacity to develop into something in the future.
‘a campaign to woo potential customers’

‘She admitted that potential savings were probably not top of the list, however.’

  • I think potential revenue can refer to past or future hypothetical revenue. Ideally I'd like to find an adjective that can only mean revenue that we had expected to receive in the past, given now-knowns such as number of customers. But I like potential because it suggests given conditions, more than any other suggested adjective so far. – Mark Nov 2 '16 at 7:51

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