0

Foreword:

I am developing a variable-processing program for my Computer Science research project.

One particular part of the program mimics the behavior of biological enzymes, except instead of catalyzing break downs and compositions of chemicals, its catalyzing break downs and compositions of variables (specifically arrays).

The process in question is a 2 part process:

  • initiating process:
    • (in terms of enzymes:) breaks down certain compounds into smaller compounds
    • (in terms of program:) fragments certain variables (certain arrays) into fragments

  • finalizing process:
    • (in terms of enzymes:) combine the smaller compounds into larger compounds different from the originals (like mixing and matching the parts)
    • (in terms of program:) combine the fragment-variables into larger variables different from the originals (like mixing and matching the parts)

The process in question all together:

  • (in terms of enzymes:) breaks down certain compounds into smaller compounds,

    then recombines them into larger compounds that are different from the original large compounds
    (like mixing and matching the parts)

  • (in terms of program:) fragments certain variables (certain arrays) into fragments

    then recombines them into larger variables that are different from the original large variables
    (like mixing and matching the parts)

What is the process in question called?

Afternote:

I'm looking for a name, so the word could be a new word constructed from recognizable Latin or Germanic roots, and that would be an acceptable answer.

To get full coverage of an answer, I asked this question the Chemistry SE site, Stackoverflow SE site, and this SE site.

  • the purpose of asking on the different sites is to get different types of feedback, so if you want to provide an answer on each site, please be considerate and don't dupe your answers. Answer with a different light and perspective. I am trying to get a full-coverage answer – user189910 Oct 20 '16 at 23:16
  • As Mitch has said, "If [an answerable question, or answer, asks about] a recent neologism that other people use ... then [it is] on-topic. If it is looking for a 'neologism', or asking if a 'word' you just made up is OK, then off-topic because it is not answerable." – Edwin Ashworth Oct 21 '16 at 21:45
-1

As you are modelling enzymes I would suggest decomposition for the breaking down process (taking the chemistry definition) and synthesis for the re-assembly process. To gain a single term to cover the entire process you could use the decomposition/synthesis process or possibly something like the decomposyn process as a neologism. You would, however, have to define "decomposyn" in your documentation.

As a matter of interest decomposition and synthesis are used to describe one of the ways of developing CNC manufacturing systems so the terms are not entirely without precedent in an IT setting.

  • Is there a way to reverse this neologism? in the case that I would want to do the reverse as well (start with synthesis, end with break down)? – user189910 Oct 21 '16 at 20:11
  • As Mitch has said, "If [an answerable question, or answer, asks about] a recent neologism that other people use ... then [it is] on-topic. If it is looking for a 'neologism', or asking if a 'word' you just made up is OK, then off-topic because it is not answerable." The non-word decomposyn is not admissible as an example of 'English ...usage'. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 21 '16 at 21:43
0

If you insist on one word, I would consider assembly and two sub-words, disassembly and reassembly, where reassembly does not necessarily result in what was originally disassembled.

From M-W:

assembly: the act of assembling something): the act of connecting together the parts of something (such as a machine) : the act of assembling something

Addendum: Enzymes merely catalyze reactions, i.e., make them go faster. Some enzymes "disassemble" while others "reassemble".

  • The issue with these is that disassemble, reassemble, and assemble are singular direction processes. The processes-all-together I am describing is simplistically described as "go forward, then immediately reverse" or "reverse, then immediately go forward." – user189910 Mar 4 '17 at 2:08
  • @DaMaxContent Tired tonight. Sorry. Sounds like nonsense to me. Every enzyme performs a "singular direction process". The only way you can have what you seem to be describing is with multiple enzymes acting in some sort of order. Maybe your enzyme analogy doesn't work. – Richard Kayser Mar 4 '17 at 2:27
  • Probably, but it was the closest anology at the time. As it is a breakdown-recompose process that needs to emphasize that the process forwards, then reverses and vice versa. – user189910 Mar 4 '17 at 2:28

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy