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This question already has an answer here:

In the following, does 'in which' sound right?

Therefore, some design patterns will be implemented programmatically during the writing of this thesis, in order to analyze and to compare. Swift is the programming language in which the patterns are implemented, and iOS is the name of the Apple’s mobile operating system (platform).

marked as duplicate by Edwin Ashworth, Mitch, jimm101, Helmar, Chenmunka Oct 18 '16 at 9:46

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    Best previous answer possibly at In which etymology, though there are better candidates for duplicates. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 17 '16 at 20:18
  • Sounds ok. Depends on how formal you're trying to sound. Could have been worded "The patterns are implemented with the Swift programming language" but "Swift is the programming language in which the patterns are implemented" gives it that pretentious sound college professors love. – developerwjk Oct 17 '16 at 20:43
  • I suspect that this use is to avoid having a preposition at the end of a clause (that old bugaboo, which never was a proscription): Swift is the programming language that the patterns are implemented in. But it sounds alright as is. – David Handelman Oct 17 '16 at 22:56
  • Why wouldn't you simply say that it's πthe programming language the patterns are implemented in”? Pied piping always leads to ugly things nobody actually says. – tchrist Oct 17 '16 at 23:09
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It's grammatically correct, but it would seem more natural to say "Swift is the programming language that is used to implement the patterns..."

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