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I want to write a sentence with the same meaning as:

It holds fast to Occam's Razor as a principle

A simpler version of the above is:

It holds Occam's Razor as a principle

I want to arrange the phrases to make something that sounds like this:

It holds fast as a principle/Occam's Razor

(where the "/" indicates pause in pronunciation) How would I be able to write such a sentence?

If you want more context: It's character talking in first person about how his mind still operate by the principle of Occam's Razor (The principle rejecting complex theories when a simpler one of equal quality is present) even though wild conjectures crowds his mind.

At times, multitudinous conjectures of the utmost wildness crowd my mind, However, tattered and constitutionally feeble my rational faculty may be, it holds fast as a principle Occam's Razor.

  • Occam's razor is a principle; only people can hold [fast] to a principle (though by extension, one could speak of a work by someone holding to it). – Edwin Ashworth Oct 15 '16 at 8:28
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    What's the question? If you are asking for proofreading then that is off topic. – Drew Oct 15 '16 at 16:21
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Given that Occam's Razor is a principle, you don't need to use "principle" it your sentence: "principle" is superfluous. You can simply say:

It holds fast to Occam's Razor.

It's not clear what "It" is though, or what your context is.

If you want to stick with your last example, you could say any of the following, depending on your context:

It holds fast as a principle: Occam's Razor.

OR

It holds fast as a principle -- Occam's Razor.

OR

It holds fast as a principle, i.e., Occam's Razor.

OR

It holds fast as a principle, Occam's Razor.

  • How about "It follows the Occam's Razor principle consistently" – BoldBen Oct 15 '16 at 7:13
  • @BoldBen Nice answer on accuracy not being a binary. Will up vote in a minute. Re this question: it's hard to know how to revise the OP's sentence without knowing more about what the OP is trying to say. There are a number of possibilities depending on what "It" is and the sentence's larger context. – Richard Kayser Oct 15 '16 at 13:51

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