0

I'm not sure about where I should put the adverb "today" in the following sentence:

His work is regarded as one of the highest peaks of Western culture.

I have a couple of options and I think that, even though with different emphases, all of them have the same meaning.

  1. Today, his work is regarded as one of the highest peaks of Western culture.
  2. His work is, today, regarded as one of the highest peaks of Western culture.
  3. His work is regarded today as one of the highest peaks of Western culture.
  4. His work is today regarded as one of the highest peaks of Western culture.

The first two options are like cheating, I'm sure they are correct. The third one sounds good to me. I'm not sure about the last one but I feel that it's like an incorrect version of the second one.

Is the fourth one OK? Any other option for placing the adverb?

  • 2
    It seems ok for me but the meanings are slightly different depending on where you place today, you emphasize it. -> Today it's true but it wasn't before – Yohann V. Oct 14 '16 at 14:44
1

The fourth one is absolutely fine. As for other options, you could also use;

  1. His work is regarded as one of the highest peaks of Western culture today.

Although this one is clunky and kind of implies a literal interpretation of "today" more than the other sentences. Personally I prefer option three the most.

  • Don't think so. Putting today at the end makes the work regarded as the highest peak of modern Western culture. Putting today at the beginning makes the work currently regarded as the summit of all Western culture. – deadrat Oct 14 '16 at 20:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.