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I'm looking for an adjective qualifying something said with a lot of authority, i.e. that the person saying it is very qualified for or familiar with the subject.

I want use it in a sentence such as "I don't fully understand your answer but [due to its many complicated and technical terms] it seems to be very <insert adjective here>."

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    "Property" isn't the word here. Perhaps "authority", but that's a little bit more limited than what I think you want. – chrylis -on strike- Oct 14 '16 at 0:24
  • @chrylis I see. I think "authority" fits well in this case. – Piovezan Oct 14 '16 at 0:37
  • @chrylis BTW, I meant it for someone who (probably) is not the creator/maintainer of an open-source software tool but knows a lot about its inner workings. – Piovezan Oct 14 '16 at 0:44
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How about informed?

I don't fully understand your answer, but it seems to be very informed.

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the person saying it is very qualified for or familiar with the subject.

An answer given by such person could be called authoritative:

authoritative - able to be trusted as being accurate or true; reliable : clear, authoritative information and advice | an authoritative source.

New Oxford American Dictionary

  • Good answer -- now I'm in doubt whether I was looking for informed or authoritative... but staying with informed seems more suited for my context. – Piovezan Oct 13 '16 at 19:01
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You may use erudite:

  • Having or showing great knowledge or learning. (AHD)

  • having or containing a lot of knowledge that is known by very few people. (Cambridge Dictionary)

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    Thank you very much for your answer. It's not the word I was trying to remember but I figured out after looking for synonyms that the word is informed. – Piovezan Oct 13 '16 at 18:46
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    I'm going to accept it. However I don't understand why upvoting this one was not possible (or perhaps someone has downvoted it). – Piovezan Oct 13 '16 at 18:47
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    Can't speak for whoever downvoted you, but I do want to note that erudite describes the person as one who is knowledgeable, not the answer. – AleksandrH Oct 13 '16 at 18:51
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    @AleksandrH - I think it may be used referring to questions or answers: From: Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons - 1980- Whether I shall be able to give him a satisfactory reply to such an erudite question is a different matter. The hon. Member for Isle of Ely described himself as the Liberal spokesman for Friday. Members of other parties, unfortunately, have to take ...books.google.it/… – user66974 Oct 13 '16 at 18:58
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    I see, in that case I think your answer's just as fine – AleksandrH Oct 13 '16 at 19:00
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How about expert?

From M-W:

expert: having or showing special skill or knowledge because of what you have been taught or what you have experienced

You example:

"I don't fully understand your answer but [due to its many complicated and technical terms] it seems to be very expert."

Expert lines up well with one of your comments:

"I meant it for someone who (probably) is not the creator/maintainer of an open-source software tool but knows a lot about its inner workings."

Your someone is displaying special skill or knowledge based on what he or she has been taught, or more likely, experienced.

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