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When was the word "chillax" first used? I'm sure it would have risen from TV or movies.

closed as off-topic by ab2, Edwin Ashworth, jimm101, Scott, NVZ Oct 13 '16 at 5:54

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  • I'm sure TV or movies picked it up from preexisting slang, to (attempt to) emulate whatever subculture the work was representing. The slang invented on/for/by media rarely has much staying power. – Dan Bron Oct 12 '16 at 20:52
  • A comment on a (very closely) related earlier question cites MW as saying first known use is 1999. I doubt if it's meaningful / reliable to attempt to single out who was "most responsible" for popularising it, since I'm sure it would already have been abortively coined many times before that. – FumbleFingers Oct 12 '16 at 21:02
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    Actually, it's from the axe made of ice that a caveman used to kill a woolly mammoth around 10,000 BC. – Hot Licks Oct 12 '16 at 22:08
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According to The Concise New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English:

  • chillax verb to calm down and relax US, 1993

The following source says that it dates back to at least 1996:

Chillax:

Source: Teen culture Year: - At least 1996 OK to Use: Only if you want to sound like a dude

  • Chillax is a combination of chill and relax. Although top Internet search results say chillax originated with the 2003 film Final Destination 2, the word actually shows up on the Internet in personal ads going as far back as January 1996 and is included in a musician’s website that includes an Ebonics dictionary with a Google date stamp of February 2, 1996. Did anyone really think Hollywood could have created the word on their own?

  • Earliest Known Quotation (film, Final Destination 2, 2003, Spoken by an unnamed kid smoking at a gas pump.) “Chillax, biatch.” Earliest Known Quotation (print, The American Spectator, Volume 36, 2003): “He told me I was overreacting and to ‘chillax.’”

(behindthegrammar.com)

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