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Whether the halfway word is defined on English dictionaries as an adverb/adjective mostly used to indicate that someone or something is At or to a point equidistant between two others, I'm usually drawn to sentences such as the following:

  • I'm half way finishing the translation.
  • I'm half way in to the second season.
  • I'm half way there.
  • When I'm half way home. The distant voices fade away.

halfway or half way? Which one is grammatically correct/accepted in order to indicate that someone/something is in the middle or in the course of an action not yet finished?

In case both halfway and half way are correct, How/When do I know which one to use?

closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, Helmar, tchrist Oct 2 '16 at 23:43

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    Neither. I would say "I'm half way to finishing the translation". – Kate Bunting Oct 2 '16 at 13:40
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    I find them both acceptable except that you need to use finishing in both cases. Having said that I prefer the one without 'the'. – BoldBen Oct 2 '16 at 14:34
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    "I have finished half of the translation." – Mark Hubbard Oct 2 '16 at 14:41
  • @MarkHubbard - As a self-taught English learner, it's very important for me to know how native English speakers usually sound, thanks for sharing your thoughts. For instance, I have been told that I can sound like a native speaker in English in a few short exchanges though. I'm really good with the American English pronunciation despite of still lacking the complete knowledge about the language. Regarding my name, thanks for the compliment, my family is Italian/Brazilian, I was born Italy and although I can speak and understand Italian very well, I'm actually a Portuguese native speaker. – Adriano Monecchi Oct 2 '16 at 15:13
  • @MarkHubbard I'd be happy using the sentence "I have finished half of the translation." - Thank you! – Adriano Monecchi Oct 2 '16 at 15:13
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Cambridge dictionary lists halfway as one word. Hence, using half the way is unusual.

halfway adjective, adverb in the middle of something, or at a place that is equally far from two other places:

New York City is halfway between Boston and Washington, DC.

I'd like you to look at the diagram that is halfway down page 27.

She started feeling sick halfway through dinner.

(http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/halfway)

I would advise against using half the way.

  • Again, you can remove the edit by making another minor change, such as "I would advise against using half the way." You can delete your comment. :-) – Mark Hubbard Oct 2 '16 at 15:18
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You can say,

I'm halfway through the translation.

Or

I'm half of the way through the translation.

But unfortunately

I'm half the way to finish the translation.

Is an unfinished translation - it still needs a little work!

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