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You will need to refresh your login details when you first access the new site and the process for doing so will be self evident immediately you try to login.

Is this an accurate use of the word immediately? Should it have a 'when' or an 'after' after it?

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  • Yes. Have a look at this definition - scroll down to the example at 'conjunction'.
    – Lawrence
    Commented Sep 29, 2016 at 12:27
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    Yes; but to make it more readable, put a comma after site and a hyphen between self and evident. Then it will sound better if the word order is changed: ... and the process for doing so will be immediately self-evident when you try to log in. (I've only seen login used as a noun. This may be changing however.) Commented Sep 29, 2016 at 12:28
  • Note that the definition @Lawrence provided has the remark British and this kind of use might not be understood elsewhere.
    – Helmar
    Commented Sep 29, 2016 at 12:41
  • @Lawrence even though the dictionary calls that usage a "Britishism", I, a British person, think it's wrong, FWIW. So even if it is a Britishism then I think it should be ignored, and that the given text needs to be amended. Commented Sep 29, 2016 at 12:56
  • @Helmar: Hmm. This NGram for knew immediately it suggests that particular sequence is twice as likely in AmE as BrE, and my guess is most instances would represent the specific context we're talking about here. Commented Sep 29, 2016 at 12:58

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No, immediately is not used as an adverb in that context, but yes, your quote is "an accurate use of the word immediately". ODO considers immediately to be a conjunction when used that way:

immediately conjunction (British) As soon as. ‘let me know immediately she arrives’

There was some discussion in the comments to your question about whether this is actually a British construct. The Ngram corpus, filtered separately for British and American usage, seems to support the dictionary's assertion, but the construct appears in American usage as well. The searches were performed using the sentence fragments "immediately they arrive" and "immediately when they arrive", the former using immediately as a conjunction and the latter using it as an adverb:

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As a matter of personal taste, I don't like this usage of immediately. Replacing it with as soon as sounds much nicer to me:

  • ... the process for doing so will be self evident as soon as you try to login.
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    I think this is quite right. Although the full OED has only one entry for immediately, headed as adv, their final definition 3b is: as conj. (ellipt. for immediately that). The moment that; as soon as. Commented Sep 30, 2016 at 14:19
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You will need to refresh your login details when you first access the new site and the process for doing so will be self evident immediately AFTER you try to login.

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