2

I am looking for a word that explain the sense of being in the fresh and cool air after rain or snow, such as this situation: After a small rain, no crowd and no noise nearby, someone walks on the road, breathes in the fresh air, feels serene, calm, peaceful and pleasant.

There is a word like 'petrichor' :

A pleasant smell that frequently accompanies the first rain after a long period of warm, dry weather.

But it means a smell, I have looked up synonyms for peace in a theasurus, get some words like 'tranquil', 'halcyon'.

UPDATE

There are some phrases/verses describe the sensation in Chinese, such as

  • 空山新雨后,天气晚来秋。(kōng shān xīn yǔ hòu, tiān qì wǎn lái qiū)

    After(后) fresh rain(新雨) in mountains bare(空山)

    Autumn(秋) permeates evening(晚) air(气).

  • 灯火阑珊处 (dēng huó lán shān chù)

    means somewhere far from the lights(灯火).

    阑珊 means there is scarcely any light or lamp.

So I wonder if there is a more suitable word(or phrase even a sentence) for the serene sensation.

ADD

Why I want to look for this word?

I am trying to name my own Wechat Official Account(where I post my writings about book and life, it seems like a blog), I named it with “不热闹”(bú rè nào), because it's a serene place for me to think and learn. So when I name it in English, I want a word to express my feelings. The “不热闹” can be transliterated as "no noise". You know this is not a translation, which can not express the sensation at all.

I found the 'petrichor' when I researched at dictionaries, so I wonder if there are some other words like it, which explains a beautiful and poetic sensation.

Then I asked my first question in this community. Thanks for your help anyway. I really feel thankful and happy (sometimes surprised) here.

  • 2
    How would you like to use it in a sentence? – Azor Ahai Sep 23 '16 at 3:54
  • @Azor-Ahai I'm trying to use it to name something. – Soyaine Sep 23 '16 at 5:43
  • Well, I can't think of a word but if you were to listen to Bing Crosby on YouTube singing the sublime lyrics of the song, "I'm dreaming of a white Christmas", you might well be inspired to come up with a word that best describes the serenity of a Yuletide snowfall. – Peter Point Sep 23 '16 at 9:39
  • Er... "serenity"? – Azor Ahai Sep 23 '16 at 15:52
  • @PeterPoint Thank you for commending this beautiful song. It's singing in the heart when listen to it. – Soyaine Sep 24 '16 at 2:13
0

The Japanese word/concept SHIBUMI comes to mind. An almost inexpressible sense of beauty, completeness or contentment.

Shibui (渋い) (adjective), shibumi (渋み) (noun), or shibusa (渋さ) (noun) are Japanese words which refer to a particular aesthetic of simple, subtle, and unobtrusive beauty. Like other Japanese aesthetic terms, such as iki and wabi-sabi, shibui can apply to a wide variety of subjects, not just art or fashion.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shibui

1

Wow! thats a dificult one. Not sure you will find the exact same concept as in chinese.

In portuguese we have what seems to be a similar saying "Depois da tempestade vem a calmaria" or the variation "Depois da tempestade vem a bonança". That means something like "after the storm everything calms down" or "after the storm everything gets good" ore something like that (just to create the idea).

I know it is not as poetical as you described. Is more a popular saying. But also I think chinese is a more poetical language.

Also the concept you describe seems to be more related to senses (I am not sure) while those are more internal. But I think there is a good proximity here.

The thing is the words "calmaria" or "bonança" outside that saying do not have EXACTLY that meaning. It works only in the saying.

"Calmaria" would be the word we use to describe when everythin calms down and nothing seems to happen.

"Bonança" is a concept similar, some times, to prosperity, and others to, how can I say, a kind of pleasure, but not like a passion. More like a passive pleasure. That sensation when every thing is right and good.

So the word you describe seems to be the combination of those two. Witch, in Brazil, is the meaning you will achieve by any variation of that saying.

Anyway, the reason I am writing all this is that I researched by that portuguese saying and found a similar one in english: "the lull before the storm".

Although they use "before" the storm and not "after" as we do in Brazil and as you describe, what creates a certain distance to the meaning you are looking for, I decided to give it a shot.

I researched at Oxford's, Cambridge's and Longman's online English-English dictionaries (witch are free and the links you can easily find googling) and, in this case, the most interesting contribution was given by longman (http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/lull#lull__3).

As a noun, "lull" would be a kind of break or pause, like "there was a lull in the conversation" or "there was a lull in the fight". So it does not enphasises exactly the feeling, but the pause, more like the "calmaria" word I expressed above, like "everithing calmed down for a period".

As a verb, one possible meaning (acording to Longman) is "to make someone feel calm or as if they want to sleep".

And other is "make someone feel safe and confident so that they are completely surprised when something bad happens"

So, although it can be also used in a context of bad intention, it does pass the idea of peace and security.

In conclusion, I don't know exactly in wich context you intend to use it. Maybe if you informed us here we could help you better.

But the nearest word I found for expressing the meaning I understood you persue is "lull". And maybe, if you use in the saying they have ("the lull before the storm"), it also might help you, as I explained in portuguese would.

Otherwise you can just describe it like "feeling of peace, fullness, lightness and sweetness on the air and the sure in the hert that everything is just right and good", for instance.

  • THANK YOU VERY MUCH Rafael. I never get such a long answer before. I have read it several times those days. It's so good that there is a similar saying in portuguese. "lull" sounds like a word to calm someone down or drop they off. Maybe I will use the "lull" to make a phrase like "LullMe" for my account name. Also thanks for your suggestion, I have updated some more information in the question. – Soyaine Sep 29 '16 at 7:18
  • It was a pleasure, @Soyaine! I Love the topic and love be helpful! So... I am just sorry I was too long, but there was that much to explain! – Rafael Thomé Guimarães Sep 30 '16 at 19:48
  • I wouldn't use lullMe. That also has the negative conotation of "deceive me". Like if you were challenging someone to deceive you, And I think that conotation wil be the first to come to mind most times. But now that you let clear what you want it for, it changes everything. But now we can get somewhere much easily. – Rafael Thomé Guimarães Sep 30 '16 at 20:10
  • I will continue in a post. Easier to type than here! – Rafael Thomé Guimarães Sep 30 '16 at 20:16
  • When I think of lull, I think of lulling someone to sleep, or a break in the action. – Richard Kayser Sep 30 '16 at 20:46
1

I used the pin yin to get a translation of bu re nao from an online translation site and thought that a good English name for your account might be 'Cool Serenity' as being the opposite of 'hot noise'. You may know that 'Cool' has a second meaning rather like 'fashionable and sophisticated' in idiomatic English so might be appropriate.

1

How about tranquility?

From Dictionary.com:

tranquility: quality or state of being tranquil; calmness; peacefulness; quiet; serenity.

tranquil: free from commotion or tumult; peaceful; quiet; calm / free from or unaffected by disturbing emotions; unagitated; serene; placid

This seems to fit well the place and sense you have in mind.

0

I tried to capture the fealing you want to transmit. Nothing more related to fisical senses came up, but some fealings did.

First, the already recommended up, "Serenity", would be a very good one! But that was already said, so I tryed another sugestions.

I came up with "Satisfaction", but that has to much other conotations and probably wont transmit what you want.

From "satisfaction" seeking more precision, I found "Fullness" or "Completeness". Those are good.

But "Emptyness" would also be good! So i Thoght of "Full of Emptyness", wich I loved! But the Brasilian poet Viviane Mosé already used that expression. So you would be quoting her. And You probably don't know her work and don't speak portuguese to learn of it. And you probably would prefer something original.

So, I kept in that line for a noum with that meaning, since a noum would also be better for what you want.

Well, I came up with "Grace", wich is beatifull, but a bit outworn.

Thoght also of "Unity" or "communion". But that is a bit more spiritual, so, I actually would have to be more familiar with your work to know if it fits.

Anyway, by describind the mind path I walked so you can use any part of it.

Hope I helped!

  • I really appreciate all the work you’ve done to help me. I'm sorry for set the another answer "accepted" instead of yours, but I have learned so much from your answer, thanks to you. – Soyaine Jan 5 '17 at 6:55
-2

So far I’ve found:

chrysalism – the amniotic tranquility of being inside during a thunderstorm
Source: “chrysalism”, from The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, “a compendium of invented words written by John Koenig”.

not quite but closer

  • 2
    Please read this about how to edit your post to meet the site’s quality standards. – tchrist Sep 16 '18 at 17:06
  • This is not a real word. It appears in The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, a blog that describes itself as "a compendium of invented words ". On that basis, I'm not inclined to edit your answer to bring it up to the necessary standard. – Chappo Says Reinstate Monica Sep 17 '18 at 13:00

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.