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I'm working as a Software Engineer in US, and I'm a non-native speaker. I am familiar with the phrase "same as".

When I read the following wiki page, I encountered a phrase consisting of "same" and "than". I am copying and pasting that sentence at the bottom of this question.

I do not clearly understand what it means. Could anyone please tell me whether the following sentence makes sense? If so, could you explain to me what it means?

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friend_function:

In object-oriented programming, a friend function, that is a "friend" of a given class, is a function that is given the same access than methods to private and protected data.

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    A grammatical error was introduced by the latest person to edit that page. – MetaEd Sep 22 '16 at 21:50
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It's a mistake.

The same is followed by as. It is not followed by that or than:

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/same-similar-identical

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There is a good explanation for this on the forum:

http://forum.wordreference.com/threads/same-than-same-as-same-that.400069/

In comparatives, when one is 'more' than the other you use 'than': bigger than, smaller than, colder than, warmer than, more interesting than, less interesting than.

When they are the same you always use 'as'. This is the same as this.

If you use another adjective you put the adjective between two 'as':

My house is as big as yours.

John is as tall as Pete, but Nick is taller than them.

So the sentence should be:

In object-oriented programming, a friend function, that is a "friend" of a given class, is a function that is given the same access as methods to private and protected data.

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