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In English, why do we usually say "talk show" not "talking show"?

marked as duplicate by Helmar, Drew, Chenmunka, tchrist Sep 20 '16 at 20:13

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    Whoever heard of a show that can talk? ;-) – Jim Sep 20 '16 at 15:27
  • Haha , I got it, but should we use an adjective before the the noun " show" ? – Paulo Sep 20 '16 at 15:29
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    not necessarily: a music show is a show about music, a cop show is about cops etc. – Some_Guy Sep 20 '16 at 15:34
  • Seriously, what @Jim said. I never heard of tracks that can race either. That's why we usually talk about racing cars on race tracks, not race cars on racing tracks. – FumbleFingers Sep 20 '16 at 15:36
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    Oh, it is like a composed word or noun. Thank you very much for your replies. – Paulo Sep 20 '16 at 15:37
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There is talking in almost every show, while a "talk show" features talk over any other kind of action or appeal.

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