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English has many complicated expressions. Can you explain to me the expression "Well, no more" in this paragraph? Thank you so much!

What women want is supposed to be some sort of unsolved mystery that has haunted males, and even females, since the dawn of civilization. Well, no more

closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, Helmar, Hellion, Scott, Chenmunka Sep 21 '16 at 11:37

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  • That is no longer the case. – Helmar Sep 20 '16 at 14:28
  • Well, I guess @Helmar is right. – FumbleFingers Sep 20 '16 at 14:29
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    Interestingly (well, to me at least), I can't find any previous ELU questions asking about the use of well as an "introductory" discourse marker. Which position usually implies in contrast to what was said previously, whereas if used in an intermediate position within an utterance it usually implies something like the phrasing I'm about to use next may not be quite appropriate / accurate, but it's the best I can come up with quickly enough to keep this conversation going. – FumbleFingers Sep 20 '16 at 14:45
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    I actually closevoted for lack of prior research (the "meaning* of the highlighted words should be obvious to anyone in ELU's target user base). But taking particular account of the usage distinction I pointed out above, I'm now inclined to think the best option might be to migrate this question to English Language Learners. – FumbleFingers Sep 20 '16 at 15:06
  • @FumbleFingers I agree. This seems to a be an eternal problem of this forum. And it's exactly beginner english speakers who would find it the least obvious that this isn't the forum for them. So no wonder this happens all the time – Some_Guy Sep 20 '16 at 15:39
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There are two things happening here which could cause confusion. Firstly 'well' is being used as an exclamation.

The second problem is that ellipsis is being used to omit a number of words. In this case something like 'It is a mystery' which would turn the phrase into the sentence 'Well, it is a mystery no more.'

The meaning is that, according to the writer, the mystery of what women want has been solved and, by implication, is about to be revealed by the writer in the rest of the piece of writing. The 'Well' is merely an exclamation to add emphasis and intrigue the reader.

  • It would probably help to say explicitly what the omitted words were. – Andrew Leach Sep 20 '16 at 14:36
  • Thank you for your comment. You all are very good at English! – vuakungfu Sep 20 '16 at 15:52
  • @AndrewLeach Quite right, I've edited my answer to include possible omitted words. – BoldBen Sep 21 '16 at 23:29

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