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Is there a word describing the belief that mathematics is the language describing the rule of God?

In other words, if someone believes that the only rules God has confined us to, are those described by the laws of physics. And the laws of physics are discerned by the language of maths. Then that would make someone a "matheist" as @Nagarajan has put it?

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    How about Matheism? – Nagarajan Shanmuganathan Sep 15 '16 at 10:29
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    I think the Pythagorean cult had ideas along these lines, but they weren't monotheists, of course. Newton and his contemporaries used to call God "the great Geometer", but I'm not sure they had the specific notion He "spoke math", per se. In short, I'm not totally clear why you expect this word to exist. Can you explain how you intend to use it? Also +1 to Nagarajan for matheism! – Dan Bron Sep 15 '16 at 10:34
  • I have edited to describe my intentions better. If someone believes that the only rules God has confined us to, are those described by the laws of physics. And the laws of physics are discerned by the language of maths. Then that would make someone a "matheist" as Nagarajan has put it? – jamie1989 Sep 15 '16 at 10:51
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    @NagarajanShanmuganathan no. Matheism means your God is the word "but". Would you really like being called a buttheist? – RegDwigнt Sep 15 '16 at 11:22
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I believe this is a reference to the following quote by Galileo: "Mathematics is the language with which God wrote the universe.".

If a physicist or mathematician talks about god with reference to physics or maths, they tend to use the term as a shorthand for "nature", or "the laws of the universe". Thus when Einstein says "God does not play dice with the universe", it's a figure of speech: he's really talking about the laws of nature, not a religious entity as such.

This type of God is often referred to as "the God of Spinoza", a 17th century Dutch philosopher, who put forward the idea that God is the universe and its laws, rather than an anthropomorphic entity existing outside the universe. Spinoza's "God" can be interchanged with such terms as "the cosmos" or "nature", both of which are defined (as far as we can tell) in mathematical terms.

Einstein himself agreed: “I believe in Spinoza's God, who reveals Himself in the lawful harmony of the world, not in a God who concerns Himself with the fate and the doings of mankind... "

Therefore, the quote from Galileo, which your question echoes, can be interpreted as support for "the god of Spinoza", (even though Spinoza came after Galileo) and since this is a commonly used term within scientific/philosopical discussion about God, you could just stick with that rather than invent something new.

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/spinoza/

EDIT:

Wikipedia has a page on "Spinozism", so I suppose a person following this could be called a Spinozist. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spinozism

EDIT2: And, in fact, from that same Wikipedia page: "In 1785, Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi published a condemnation of Spinoza's pantheism, after Lessing was thought to have confessed on his deathbed to being a "Spinozist", which was the equivalent in his time of being called a heretic. "

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  • Specifically, what would an individual believing in the god of Spinoza be called? A physicist/mathematician etc can believe in Christianity, so these can't be the name which the believer is referred to as? – jamie1989 Sep 15 '16 at 11:06
  • See my edit on this. – Max Williams Sep 15 '16 at 11:15

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