2

What is the name for the people on the street who often times work for a non-profit organization and usually are soliciting donations (but maybe doing other things such as collecting signatures for a petition, or just spreading information)?

You can usually tell who they are because they're wearing a uniform and holding clipboards and approaching strangers who walk by. I was just accosted by one and would like to know how to refer to them so I can relay the story to other people.

  • One less rant on Facebook. A close vote well used. – DJClayworth Sep 14 '16 at 3:39
  • Excellent question. If it were by phone, it would be telephone solicitation. I really don't know what to call these people, but I would like to know. They're not necessarily volunteers. – aparente001 Sep 14 '16 at 4:59
  • 1
    @tchrist please confirm why this is not a good fit for this site? Considering there are well used tags for this type of questions it is unclear. – Celeritas Sep 14 '16 at 6:52
  • @aparente001 agreed, the first word that popped into my mind was volunteer but this may be inaccurate as 1) their job requires them to perform this function 2) they may be paid for this work. Hence, not a volunteer. – Celeritas Sep 14 '16 at 6:59
  • 1
    In the UK at least, these people are often referred to as "chuggers", which is a portmanteau of "charity muggers": en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_fundraising – JonLarby Sep 14 '16 at 8:08
5

In the UK at least, these people are often referred to as "chuggers", which is a portmanteau of "charity muggers": en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_fundraising

1

For use in the U.S., I will make something up, based on the comment by @blackpen.

Political hawkers

Also, I suppose one could use the existing word

Leafletters

(from the verb to leaflet)

1

Generically, these are 'canvassers'. They 'canvas', and the results are a 'canvas':

v.tr
....
2. a. To go through (a region) or go to (persons) to solicit votes or orders.
v.intr
....
2. To solicit voters, orders, or opinions.
n.
....
2. A solicitation of votes or orders.


[From obsolete canvass, to toss in a canvas sheet as punishment, from canvas.]


can′vass·er n.

(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. S.v. "canvasser." Retrieved September 21 2016 from http://www.thefreedictionary.com/canvasser.)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.