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In referring to components of a large project, the terms work-stream, or work stream are often used in business. Is there a better or alternative phrase for expressing this concept?

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    From what I saw here for work stream, I would use phases of the project instead. But work-stream as such is well-defined. Why do you need a different phrase? Sep 13, 2016 at 17:26
  • You are correct, work-stream, and work stream, are well defined and commonly used. Workstream, is not most English dictionaries or spell-checkers. I was looking for an alternative, or more elegant, term to indicate phases of a project the occur simultaneously. Sep 13, 2016 at 19:35
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    I think that if you do some reading about project management, you will absorb some helpful terminology, such as project lifespan, project life cycle, and phases. By the way, it's not clear to me from your question whether you want a word for the components or for the whole thing. Sep 14, 2016 at 4:30

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Workflow is probably a more common term. According to ODO,

noun The sequence of industrial, administrative, or other processes through which a piece of work passes from initiation to completion.

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workstream is not hyphenated, and according to the Business Dictionary:The progressive completion of tasks completed by different groups within a company which are required to finish a single project. For example, the work stream for a manufacturing facility may include engineering, drafting, procurement, fabrication, quality control and shipping.

Workflow is the sequence of industrial, administrative, or other processes through which a piece of work passes from initiation to completion.

There doesn't appear to be a 'more correct' word other than these two

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