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I'd like to refer to a group of people that includes professors and PhD students that I worked with on a particular project. Me being not part of that community.

Is it ok just to say "We collaborated with the XYZ university community" or "with a group of people from the XYZ university"?

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Is it ok just to say "We collaborated with the XYZ university community" or "with a group of people from the XYZ university"?

A group of people working together on a project (esp. a research project) is often referred to as a team:

• two or more people working together : a team of researchers

New Oxford American Dictionary

I would suggest "We collaborated with a team of researchers from XYZ university" or "We collaborated with an artificial intelligence research team from XYZ university".

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You could probably use something like "with members of the XYZ university academic community".

You can't just say "with the university's academic community", because in this case, you didn't collaborate with the whole of the university's academic community.)

For example, see 'The role of academic community in higher learning', http://lchc.ucsd.edu/mca/Paper/Graham/acad_com.htm

  • +1 for both “members” & “academic”! It’s probably clear enough with just “members” but to get even further away from “the whole of the university's academic community” perhaps, space permitting, adding “various” or “a variety of” to your good answer would remove any lingering doubt, if any (& emphasize the fact that different types were involved): "with various [distinguished] members of the XYZ university academic community" or "with a variety of [distinguished] members of the XYZ university academic community" (adding if justified, “distinguished” just to earn a few brownie points!) – Papa Poule Sep 10 '16 at 14:50
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University community is far too broad, incorporating essentially the entire university or all of academia.

There are many possibilities when the scope of the collaboration is a project or program. For example:

  • If you collaborated on a project with a single professor (Professor Smith, say) and that professor's postdocs, Ph.D. students, research assistants, etc., you could/would say, "I collaborated with the Smith (research) group at University X on Project Y" or "I collaborated with the [insert subject-matter area] (research) group at University X on Project Y"

  • If you collaborated with multiple professors, and their postdocs, PhD. students, etc. at a single university on a shared project, you could/would say, "I participated in Project X at University Y." If that project was part of a larger program, or conducted in a "center" devoted to research in a particular subject-matter area, e.g., nanotechnology, you could/would say, "I collaborated with the nanotechnology program at University X on Project Y" or "I collaborated with the nanotechnology center at University X on Project Y."

  • If you collaborated on a project that involved professors, postdocs, etc. from multiple universities, you could/would most likely reference the name of the project/program and the name of the entity, e.g., center, under whose auspices the project/program was established/conducted.

If I had more information, I could be more specific.

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"We worked/collaborated with professors and PhD students from XYZ university" should suffice. "Group of people" is too general; it could mean anybody from that university. It would be even better if you could mention what kind of professors you worked with, with regards to their fields of research. This applies when referring to PhD students too.

Also, it sounds like you're talking about research of some sort that involves professors and PhD students from a university. Try referring to each of them individually, with respect to the specific work that they contributed to your collaboration with them.

  • Thanks. You're right that it would be clearer to name specifics. However, it's important for me for the expression to be a brief bulletpoint (in a resume). What about "research group" or "artificial intelligence research group" even if said group is not necessarily official? I'd use professors and PhD students, but I also want to include science doctors, which is not the same as a professor, but sounds more awkward. – Circuit in the wall Sep 10 '16 at 10:31
  • @Circuitinthewall "Research group" is fine in most cases, whether it be formal or informal. For example, "the Bill Phillip's research group" or the laser-cooling research group". One often refers to "science doctors who are not professors" as "senior scientists" or "principle investigators". – Richard Kayser Sep 10 '16 at 16:51
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People who work with you on a project can often be referred to as colleagues. If you don't want to be specific you can say 'we collaborated with colleagues from xxx'. Alternatively, 'we worked (together) with colleagues from' if you risk having too many instances of 'collaborate' and want some variation of style.

  • OP cannot refer to this group as colleagues because "Me being not part of that community". Could maybe use an expression like "with X and his/her/their colleagues" – Ben Aveling Sep 11 '16 at 0:04
  • Once you have worked with people I would say it's reasonable to call them colleagues. If you have never met the people personally nor ever socialised with them then you might feel that colleague is too familiar a term. I tried to cover that by saying often above rather than always. It may be that in some lines of work a stricter interpretation is placed on colleague than mine - perhaps the usage varies. – Jams O'Donnell Sep 11 '16 at 0:41

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