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Below a part of subtitles from the Angry Birds movie.

77 00:04:25,400 --> 00:04:26,435 Get outta here!

78 00:04:26,520 --> 00:04:28,440 Already? But you're the only one that's had cake.

79 00:04:28,480 --> 00:04:29,480 What...

80 00:04:29,640 --> 00:04:30,640 Mmm.

81 00:04:31,040 --> 00:04:32,268 Oh, that's good stuff.

Can you please tell me what "-'s" is in the bold sentence above? Does "-'s" represent "has", "is" or anything else?

marked as duplicate by NVZ, curiousdannii, Helmar, Hot Licks, tchrist Sep 10 '16 at 19:05

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"That's" in this context is a contraction for "that has."

"Already? But you're the only one that has had cake."

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    Absolutely correct, but it's worth saying that the usage is colloquial and ungrammatical. In standard English it would be 'You're the only only one who's had cake', but probably that's would be more commonly used. Perhaps this is what confused the OP. – BoldBen Sep 10 '16 at 8:05
  • @BoldBen Janus Bahs Jacquet's accepted answer at Choice of relative pronouns: 'who' and/or 'that' for people? says that 'Restrictive clauses ... can take both pronominal and non-pronominal relativisers (i.e., 'that' or 'wh-words') with no real difference in meaning or usage.' – Edwin Ashworth Sep 10 '16 at 16:43

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