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What is the word or phrase to describe something that occurs in a specific local setting?

If "geographically" describes a setting that can point to a particular place on the globe, what is the word or phrase that can describe a setting that is more local?

Let's say a crime is committed. We speculate that someone might be the perpetrator because he was in the vicinity. What is the word or phrase to describe the vicinity he was in?

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  • How about scene, setting, neighborhood, or locale? Commented Sep 11, 2016 at 2:43

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Maybe "regionally" or "locally?"

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    Nakaan while your answer is fitting, this site strives to provide objective answers. Take the site tour or have a look at the help center to find out more about good answers. As it stands your answer is purely subjective and could be improved by adding references. Please explain why your suggestions may be good fits.
    – Helmar
    Commented Sep 10, 2016 at 12:07
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The OP says "Let's say a crime is committed. We speculate that someone might be the perpetrator because he was in the vicinity. What is the word or phrase to describe the vicinity he was in?"

It is not clear why the word vicinity itself will not serve (the state, character, or quality of being near in space, OED)

An alternative could be neighbourhood (A district or portion of a town, city, or country, esp. considered in reference to the character or circumstances of its inhabitants. A small sector of a larger urban area, provided with its own shops and other facilities. The vicinity or surrounding area, OED)

"...the perpetrator because he was in the neighbourhood".

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For crimes specifically there is a widely-used phrase 'the scene of the crime'. British Police have people called Scene Of Crime Officers (SOCO is the common abbreviation).

In some informal settings, often for humorous effect, that phrase will be re-used, for example when walking past a bar "There's the place I got dead drunk last week." "Ah, the scene of the crime."

Another common phrase is 'the place in question' even though no question has been asked, it's just a phrase meaning a specific location that has already been referred to, e.g.

"I tripped and hurt my knee last night, see, here is the place in question."

From that, we get the useful word 'place', which is a small defined piece of geography and may fit your needs. Smaller than place is 'spot'.

"Where precisely was the evidence found?" "This is the place, and here is the exact spot".

Place is presumed to be larger than spot, but they are both usefully vague terms.

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