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I want to combine these two sentences into one, and I am not sure what is the best practice.

A virtual Tx is an image of the physical Tx at a reflector plane.
A virtual Rx is an image of the physical Rx at a reflector plane.

I wrote this:

A virtual Tx (Rx) is an image of the physical Tx (Rx) at a reflector plane.

Since Tx and Rx are two different things, I am not sure about the usage of the parentheses as they usually imply synonyms or descriptors.

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    To somebody who knows that Tx and Rx are two different things, I think, your proposed sentence is clear and concise. Maybe it would help adding an or inside the parenthesis. For example, "I upvote (or downvote) a post if I find it helpful (or not helpful)." – NVZ Sep 9 '16 at 12:38
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    Why not say A virtual Tx (or Rx) ...? – bib Sep 9 '16 at 13:04
  • "Virtual Tx and Virtual Rx are images of the physical Tx and physical Rx respectively at a reflector plane." or "Virtual Tx and Virtual Rx are images of their respective physical counterparts at a reflector plane." In either case, it seems moving the conditional "at a reflector plane" from the end to the front may improve readability. Good Luck. – Kris Sep 9 '16 at 13:19
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Readers who know that Tx and Rx are two different things, will find your proposed sentence okay. Maybe, adding an or would help clarify.

"A virtual Tx (or Rx) is an image of the physical Tx (or Rx) at a reflector plane."

"If this answer is useful (or not useful), then upvote (or downvote) it."

In many informal situations, slashes are used.

"If this answer is good/bad, then vote it up/down."

You can also rewrite the sentence.

"Good and bad answers are voted up and down, respectively."

RespectivelyDictionary

adverb 2. (of two or more things, with reference to two or more things previously mentioned) referring or applying to in a parallel or sequential way
"Joe and Bob escorted Betty and Alice, respectively."

  • I've googled enough for one lifetime, and yet couldn't find any references to cite here. I'd like to see opinions from senior members regarding my answer. – NVZ Sep 9 '16 at 17:18
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It is common to use a slash/virgule in cases like that:

The slash is commonly used in many languages as a shorter substitute for the conjunction "or", typically with the sense of exclusive or. Its use in this sense is somewhat informal.

In your specific case, you could also use the acronym TXRX.

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