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"the article demonstrated that managers often utilize insight, vision, and intuition, rather than statistics, factual details, and reports."

I used this sentence. I wanted to know if this kind of "double" list is acceptable in English writing. It seems pretty legitimate, but I wanted to try and find the official answer.

closed as unclear what you're asking by tchrist Nov 12 '16 at 22:40

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  • This looks good to me. I don't know what counts for you as an "official answer! – TonyK Sep 8 '16 at 13:23
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Some consider the three-part list to be the second-most powerful tool in English. Using two like that increases the impact of both.

The comma in intuition, rather is not necessary and here, it spoils the flow.

As TonyK says, that hyphen has no place. The first of a pair of hyphens opens an aside, which needs to be closed with the second, as for instance: the article demonstrated that managers - among others - often utilize insight, vision, and intuition rather than statistics, factual details, and reports

  • As a side note, It would be an em dash, not a hyphen. – AlannaRose Sep 22 '16 at 20:40
  • Thanks AlannaRose and while you can find very detailed expositions on the different uses of hyphens, en- and em-dashes in places like getitwriteonline.com/archive/091502enem.htm those are not fast rules and they have no place in grammar; only in typography and even there, rather archaically. Grammatically it might just be possible to distinguish hyphens from all dashes too soon, you're into pin dancing. – Robbie Goodwin Sep 22 '16 at 21:07
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I shall use a hyphen to make the sentence look better. "the article demonstrated that managers often utilize insight, vision, and intuition- rather than statistics, factual details, and reports."

  • No, that is not a correct use of the hyphen in educated English. – TonyK Sep 8 '16 at 13:22

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