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What is the difference between the following sentences if I were to use "off" instead of " out of" ? It seems like the usage of "off" an alternative. Are both acceptable?

1.But within psychology, the concept developed out of a growing emphasis on research on the interaction of emotion and thought. (original sentence)

Source :http://eqi.org/salov2.htm

2.But within psychology, the concept developed off a growing emphasis on research on the interaction of emotion and thought.

Examples I found which apparently have similar structures, but they use "off" as follows:

3.The concept developed off the idea that whatever it was you were looking to do or whatever problem you needed to solve, the answer or solution could be found at the center.

4....a creation and concept developed brilliantly off a popular episode of the old "Make Room for Daddy" show with Danny Thomas...

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  • "off" is more colloquial here. Aug 30, 2016 at 12:11
  • "sprang from," "evolved from," "originated in," "grew quite naturally from," "grew organically from," and "emerged from" are some other options you may not have thought of. Don Aug 30, 2016 at 12:54

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According to google ngram, the latter is rarely used.

Even more idiomatic however seems developed from.

Which makes sense if you consider the dictionary definition of from:

from 10 Indicating a source of knowledge or the basis for one’s judgement:

information obtained from papers, books, and presentations -ODO

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